Chevy trucks celebrate 100 years of shaping how Americans work and travel


chevy truck 1

Forget the ’57 Chevy, the Corvette and Camaro.

With 100 years of production and the auto industry’s oldest continually used nameplate, the archetypal hero vehicle for General Motors’ biggest brand is a Chevrolet truck, and it’s celebrating a century on the market.

Chevy trucks turn 100 this fall, just in time for the brand to capitalize on its hard-earned, hardworking reputation with new models in the hottest parts of the market with the Traverse SUV on sale now and a new generation of pickups coming soon.

“GM’s been in the truck market forever, even when it was less popular,” IHS Markit senior analyst Stephanie Brinley said. “The Silverado pickup and Suburban SUV grew up with America.” Engineered was about as basic as it gets: a one-ton flatbed with no cab, roof, doors or padding on its wooden bench seat. It was literally a horseless carriage, a mild adaptation of the age-old design that put a 36-hp 3.6L four-cylinder engine in front of the driver, where a horse would have gone a year earlier.

Prices started at $1,325, a pretty penny at the time, and more than double the $600 Ford charged for the Model TT that had debuted as its first pickup a few months earlier.

“Chevrolet’s trucks have been a critical part GM’s business model for much of the company’s history,” said Karl Brauer, executive publisher of Autotrader and Kelley Blue Book. “The Ford/GM rivalry has forced both companies to repeatedly up their game over the past century.”

Until Ford and Chevrolet hit on essentially the same idea of developing a vehicle specifically to haul and tow, pickups had been modified cars. A customizer would buy a car from the factory, chop its frame up to create a longer cargo bed and get rid of unnecessary frills such as rear seats and doors. The 1918 Chevy One-Ton and Model TT created a new class of more capable and durable vehicles.

GM built a whopping 384 of those Chevy trucks in 1918, all of them at a factory in Flint, not far from where GM still has a huge pickup plant. A second plant in Oakland, Calif., started building Chevy trucks for customers on the West Coast in 1919.

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1939 – 1946 “Arsenal of Democracy” — In 1942, all Chevy factories were converted to support the war effort. Chevy built military 6×6 trucks, aircraft engines parts, 90 mm cannon barrels and the T17E1 “Staghound,” a 14-ton armored car equipped with two 6-cylinder engines. (Photo: Chevrolet)

People began to expect more from their trucks by the 1930s. The vehicles began doubling as family transportation for farmers and Chevy responded with niceties such as windows, doors fenders and running boards on its second-generation pickup. Prices started at $400.

The Chevrolet Suburban essentially invented the SUV and the luxurious, truck-based people hauler when it went on sale in 1935. “It was built on a truck chassis and shared lots of sheet metal and mechanical parts with the pickups,” GM Heritage Center director Greg Wallace said.

The Suburban is the auto industry’s longest continually used model name, and the progenitor of modern family-carrying 4WD vehicles.

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1935 THE FIRST CHEVROLET SUBURBAN Chevrolet introduced the Suburban Carryall, a closed body one half ton truck platform with seating for eight people. It would evolve into today’s SUV.  (Photo: Chevrolet)

Pickups gained style and panache when legendary GM design chief Harley Earl lent his magic to the 1938 half-ton pickup, which shared some design cues with Chevrolet cars.

When Detroit reinvented itself as the Arsenal of Democracy during World War II, civilian vehicle production stopped and GM plants built engines, axles and more for hundreds of thousands of troop- and cargo-carrying Chevy and GMC trucks.

After the war, aerodynamic styling wraparound windshields made pickups more socially acceptable and introduced the first trucks that enthusiasts would customize and turn into hot rods. Chevy’s 1955 Cameo Carrier pickup was called “the Gentleman’s Truck,” thanks to features such as an automatic transmission and chrome bumpers. It was a signature vehicle for future GM design chief Chuck Jordan, whose other work included the ultimate expression of tail fins on the 1959 Cadillac.

Pickups and SUVs grew more popular for the next four decades despite a few lulls when fuel prices rose and the economy faltered.

Chevy has provided its own list of iconic pickups from 1918 to the current Silverado:

  • 1918 One-Ton
  • 1929 International Series Light Duty
  • 1938 Half-Ton
  • 1947 3100 Series
  • 1955 3124 Series Cameo Carrier
  • 1967 C10 Fleetside
  • 1973 C30 One-Ton Dually
  • 1988 K1500 Sportside Silverado
  • 1999 Silverado 1500 LT Z71
  • 2007 Silverado 1500 LTZ
  • 2017 Colorado ZR2
  • 2017 Silverado All-Star Edition

It was the most recent step in Chevy trucks’ 100-year evolution from a doorless buckboard that just happened to have an engine instead of a horse.

Chevy trucks through the years:

1918 One-Ton

MSRP: $1,325 (Chassis), $1,460 (Express)

Engine: 3.67L OHV 4-cylinder (224 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 36

U.S. population: 103.2 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.25

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.29

Average household income: $1,518 per year

 

 

1929 International Series Light Duty

MSRP: $400 (Chassis), $595 (Sedan Delivery)

Engine: 3.18L OHV 6-cylinder (194 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 46

Torque: 125 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 121.8 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.21

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.56

Average household income: $1,582

Price of a new home: $7,246

 

1938 Half-Ton

MSRP: $592

Engine: 3.5L I-6 (216.5 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 78

Torque: 170 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 129.8 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.16

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.17

Average household income: $1,730

Price of a new home: $3,900

 

1947 3100 Series

MSRP: $1,087

Engine: 3.5L I-6 (216.5 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 78

Torque: 170 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 144.1 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.19

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.33

Average household income: $2,850

Price of a new home: $6,600

 

1955 3124 Series Cameo Carrier

MSRP: $1,981

Engine: 3.85L Inline Six (235 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 123

Torque: 210 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 165.9 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.25

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.38

Average household income: $4,130

Price of a new home: $10,950

 

1967 C10 Fleetside

MSRP: $2,408

Engine: 4.79L Inline Six (292 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 153

Torque: 255 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 198.7 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.33

Price of a gallon of milk: $1.03

Average household income: $7,143

Price of a new home: $24,600

 

1973 C30 One-Ton Dually

MSRP: $4,388

Engine: 5.03L V8 (307 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 130

Torque: 220 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 211.9 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.39

Price of a gallon of milk: $1.31

Average household income: $10,512

Price of a new home: $35,500

 

1988 K1500 Sportside Silverado

MSRP: $12,747

Engine: 5.7L V8

Horsepower: 185

Torque: 295 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 244.5 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $1.08

Price of a gallon of milk: $2.30

Average household income: $27,225

Price of a new home: $138,300

 

1999 Silverado 1500 LT Z71

MSRP: $31,384

Engine: 5.3L V8

Horsepower: 270

Torque: 320 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 279 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $1.17

Price of a gallon of milk: $3.32

Average household income: $39,973

Price of a new home: $195,800

2007 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ (Photo: Chevrolet)

 

2007 Silverado 1500 LTZ

MSRP: $34,990

Engine: 5.3L V8

Horsepower: 315

Torque: 338 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 301.2 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $3.38

Price of a gallon of milk: $3.87

Average household income: $50,823

Price of a new home: $313,600

 

Information was reblogged from http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2017/09/28/chevy-trucks-general-motors/702921001/

To shop Jack Maxton Chevy Truck inventory, please visit www.jackmaxton.com

Car Care: Be Prepared for Winter Conditions


Taking the proper precautions can make all the difference

With winter in full swing, it’s important to take the correct precautions for driving during this potentially dangerous time of year.

In winter, nighttime comes earlier and days are often gloomy, so you need every edge you can get on the road. In many regions, even those that don’t see much snow or experience frigid temperatures, the change of seasons is a good time to make sure you’ve taken some steps to keep you safe on the road.

Stay visible. When there are fewer hours of daylight, you rely more heavily upon your vehicle’s lighting system. Have your battery and charging system checked for proper operation. A low-charging level or weak battery can lead to reduced output from the headlights, putting you at a disadvantage for spotting and avoiding obstacles. In addition, you need to  ensure that all of your car’s other lights are operating properly, including  the tail and stop lights, blinkers, position lamps and even reverse lamps. These lights help you stay visible to other cars on the road and clue them into your next move, thereby increasing your chances of being spotted.

Check your battery. Your battery is extremely important in helping your car start during cold temperatures. When the temperature drops to freezing or below, vehicles have a harder time getting going. Oil runs thicker, which makes the engine harder to turn over for the starter motor. Battery output dips with the temperature, too, so it’s important to make sure yours has enough power to make it to the starting circuit, and that there’s enough in reserve. A battery that turns the engine slowly in the cold may just need its terminals cleaned, or there may be a cable in need of repair or replacement. This is a problem that will strike its hardest at the absolute worst moment.

Check the tires. Your tire pressure can drop by up to 2 pounds per square inch (psi) for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit, which means you could be driving around with seriously underinflated tires, thereby making handling less predictable. In regions that get significant winter precipitation, it’s a good idea to invest in a set of winter tires for an edge in turning and stopping when it’s sloppy and slick.

Check your coolant. It may sound counter-intuitive to make sure the engine cooling system, and the coolant itself, are up to snuff when it’s cold outside. But consider this: the cooling system provides your cabin heat, and coolant is a mix of alcohol, water, and additives to prevent low-temperature freezing of the engine.

Prepare for emergencies. Carrying a few simple things can make a big difference, too. Pack a blanket so you can stay warm without having to run the engine if you get stuck for a prolonged period of time. A flashlight and some extra batteries, extra window washer, a compact shovel and even a small bag of sand for emergency traction are all good items to keep in your car. An emergency kit with jumper cables, road flares and a couple of basic tools will go a long way toward keeping you alive and safe in the worst circumstances.

Winter needn’t be something to be afraid of if you plan ahead. Having a thorough inspection by a qualified mechanic and keeping an emergency kit in your car will go a long way to keeping you safe on the road this winter.

This article is presented by Jack Maxton Chevrolet in Worthington, Ohio.

Chevrolet is Global Leader for Android Auto, Apple CarPlay


All-new 2016 Cruze is one of 14 Chevrolet models to offer compatibility
LOS ANGELES – According to Strategy Analytics, there are more than 2.3 billion
smartphones in use globally, and that number continues to rise. And on the road,
customers are demanding better integration between phones and their vehicles.
Whether they have an Apple or Android phone, Chevrolet is committed to providing
the smartest, simplest connected driving experience possible to owners across the
globe.

For the 2016 model year, Chevrolet will offer Android Auto and Apple CarPlay
compatibility in more models than any automotive brand. The 14 Chevrolet models
include the all-new 2016 Cruze, which will debut on June 24. Cruze is Chevrolet’s
best-selling passenger car, with more than 3 million sold since launch. Additional
models are listed in a chart below.

“For most of us, our smartphones are essential,” said Mary Barra, CEO of General
Motors. “Partnering with Apple and Google to offer CarPlay and Android Auto
compatibility across the widest range of models in the industry is a great example
of how Chevrolet continues to democratize technology that’s important to our
customers.”

Chevrolet’s seven-inch MyLink system gives owners a smart and simple way to
access both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. The eight-inch version of MyLink will
be compatible only with Apple CarPlay at the beginning of the 2016 model year.
While development and testing is not yet complete, Android Auto compatibility may
be available on the eight-inch version of MyLink later in the 2016 model year.

Each system builds off of the features smartphone users rely on most. Android Auto
is built around Google Maps, Google Now and the ability to talk to Google, as well
as a growing audio and messaging app ecosystem that includes WhatsApp, Skype,
Google Play Music, Spotify, and podcast players. A full list of supported apps is
available at Android.com/auto.

Apple CarPlay takes the iPhone features you’d want to access while driving and puts
them on the vehicle’s display in a smart, simple manner. That allows drivers to
make calls, send and receive messages and listen to music right from the
touchscreen or by voice via Siri. Apple CarPlay supported apps include Phone,
Messages, Maps, Music and compatible third-party apps. A full list of those apps can
be found at Apple.com/ios/carplay.

Many features can be controlled via voice commands through a button on the
steering wheel, helping drivers spend more time with eyes on the road and hands
on the wheel.

Chevrolet has a strong track record when it comes to broad availability of
customer-centric innovation as the first brand to introduce Siri Eyes Free
functionality and the first and only car company to offer available OnStar 4G LTE
connectivity across a range of cars, trucks and crossovers in the U.S. and Canada.
In less than one year, Chevrolet has connected more than a half-million customers
to high-speed 4G LTE Wi-Fi.

Chevrolet customers in markets around the world including Brazil, Mexico and
Canada will benefit from this new level of smartphone integration. Specific market
availability for Android Auto can be found here. Current Apple CarPlay markets can
be found here.

In 2014, the 14 models included in this rollout accounted for more than 2.4 million
vehicle sales, or 51 percent of Chevrolet’s total global sales.
Using either application is simple in a compatible 2016 Chevrolet. A “Projection”
icon on the MyLink screen is visible when a phone is not connected, then changes
to indicate either CarPlay or Android Auto (whichever is applicable) when a
compatible phone is connected via USB. Android Auto requires a phone running the
Android Lollipop 5.0 operating system or above, while Apple CarPlay requires an
iPhone 5 or later.

Compatible apps need to be downloaded to a phone before using. Apple and
Google’s privacy statements and terms of use apply. Data plan rates may also
apply.

For Release: Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 3 p.m. EDT Information provided by http://www.chevy.com

What Kind of Vehicle is the Safest for Your Teen?


Giving a set of keys to a teen-ager can flood the parent of even the most cautious new driver with fear. Now a new study shows that the safest kind of vehicle for teen drivers might be a big sport utility vehicle.
The research comes from the Highway Loss Data Institute, a firm run by insurance companies to find ways of reducing crashes and deaths. Using five years’ worth of insurance claims from 2005 to 2010, the HLDI compared the collision rates between adults drivers between 35 and 60 years old and teen drivers between the ages of 16 and 19.
Regardless of the kind of vehicle involved, the HLDI logically found that teens had accidents at a higher rate than adults. For the sliver of teen-agers who somehow find their way to the seat of a supersport motorcycle, the institute found they were more than four times as likely to get into a crash than an older driver. In vehicles with four wheels, teen drivers were up to 2.5 times more likely to have an accident in sports cars.
What surprised researchers was that the crash rate for teens in small cars of all types was still much higher than average — roughly twice as high as adults in the same vehicles, and only slightly lower than the rise of driving a regular motorcycle.  Kim Hazelbaker, senior vice president of HLDI, said in an institute report that small cars may be less forgiving in sudden maneuvers, or that teens may be encouraged to take more risks due to the car’s size.
The lowest risk vehicle for a teen driver? Large and luxury SUVs, where the crash rates for youths were as little as 10% greater than for adults, and posed a lower crash risk than all but the largest cars.
The reason for the gap? Technology. The HLDI study analyzed claims from vehicles newer than the 2006 model year. By that time, large SUVs came standard with electronic stability control — systems that keep vehicles from skidding in emergency maneuvers which has been shown to drastically reduce crashes — while in many cars the tech was still an option, especially smaller, cheaper models that teens often drive. As of the 2012 model year, all vehicles sold in the United States are required by law to offer ESC standard.
Other HLDI studies have shown newer SUVs also do a better job of protecting passengers from injuries and death in crashes than smaller cars and pickups. It defies parental logic to think the safest ride for a 16-year-old might be a two-ton truck, and no vehicle can keep all reckless drivers from harming themselves or others, but for some teens the best answer to driving safely may be to go big.

http://autos.yahoo.com/news/why-the-safest-car-for-a-teen-driver-may-be-a-big-suv.html