Chevy trucks celebrate 100 years of shaping how Americans work and travel


chevy truck 1

Forget the ’57 Chevy, the Corvette and Camaro.

With 100 years of production and the auto industry’s oldest continually used nameplate, the archetypal hero vehicle for General Motors’ biggest brand is a Chevrolet truck, and it’s celebrating a century on the market.

Chevy trucks turn 100 this fall, just in time for the brand to capitalize on its hard-earned, hardworking reputation with new models in the hottest parts of the market with the Traverse SUV on sale now and a new generation of pickups coming soon.

“GM’s been in the truck market forever, even when it was less popular,” IHS Markit senior analyst Stephanie Brinley said. “The Silverado pickup and Suburban SUV grew up with America.” Engineered was about as basic as it gets: a one-ton flatbed with no cab, roof, doors or padding on its wooden bench seat. It was literally a horseless carriage, a mild adaptation of the age-old design that put a 36-hp 3.6L four-cylinder engine in front of the driver, where a horse would have gone a year earlier.

Prices started at $1,325, a pretty penny at the time, and more than double the $600 Ford charged for the Model TT that had debuted as its first pickup a few months earlier.

“Chevrolet’s trucks have been a critical part GM’s business model for much of the company’s history,” said Karl Brauer, executive publisher of Autotrader and Kelley Blue Book. “The Ford/GM rivalry has forced both companies to repeatedly up their game over the past century.”

Until Ford and Chevrolet hit on essentially the same idea of developing a vehicle specifically to haul and tow, pickups had been modified cars. A customizer would buy a car from the factory, chop its frame up to create a longer cargo bed and get rid of unnecessary frills such as rear seats and doors. The 1918 Chevy One-Ton and Model TT created a new class of more capable and durable vehicles.

GM built a whopping 384 of those Chevy trucks in 1918, all of them at a factory in Flint, not far from where GM still has a huge pickup plant. A second plant in Oakland, Calif., started building Chevy trucks for customers on the West Coast in 1919.

chevy truck 2

1939 – 1946 “Arsenal of Democracy” — In 1942, all Chevy factories were converted to support the war effort. Chevy built military 6×6 trucks, aircraft engines parts, 90 mm cannon barrels and the T17E1 “Staghound,” a 14-ton armored car equipped with two 6-cylinder engines. (Photo: Chevrolet)

People began to expect more from their trucks by the 1930s. The vehicles began doubling as family transportation for farmers and Chevy responded with niceties such as windows, doors fenders and running boards on its second-generation pickup. Prices started at $400.

The Chevrolet Suburban essentially invented the SUV and the luxurious, truck-based people hauler when it went on sale in 1935. “It was built on a truck chassis and shared lots of sheet metal and mechanical parts with the pickups,” GM Heritage Center director Greg Wallace said.

The Suburban is the auto industry’s longest continually used model name, and the progenitor of modern family-carrying 4WD vehicles.

chevy truck 3

1935 THE FIRST CHEVROLET SUBURBAN Chevrolet introduced the Suburban Carryall, a closed body one half ton truck platform with seating for eight people. It would evolve into today’s SUV.  (Photo: Chevrolet)

Pickups gained style and panache when legendary GM design chief Harley Earl lent his magic to the 1938 half-ton pickup, which shared some design cues with Chevrolet cars.

When Detroit reinvented itself as the Arsenal of Democracy during World War II, civilian vehicle production stopped and GM plants built engines, axles and more for hundreds of thousands of troop- and cargo-carrying Chevy and GMC trucks.

After the war, aerodynamic styling wraparound windshields made pickups more socially acceptable and introduced the first trucks that enthusiasts would customize and turn into hot rods. Chevy’s 1955 Cameo Carrier pickup was called “the Gentleman’s Truck,” thanks to features such as an automatic transmission and chrome bumpers. It was a signature vehicle for future GM design chief Chuck Jordan, whose other work included the ultimate expression of tail fins on the 1959 Cadillac.

Pickups and SUVs grew more popular for the next four decades despite a few lulls when fuel prices rose and the economy faltered.

Chevy has provided its own list of iconic pickups from 1918 to the current Silverado:

  • 1918 One-Ton
  • 1929 International Series Light Duty
  • 1938 Half-Ton
  • 1947 3100 Series
  • 1955 3124 Series Cameo Carrier
  • 1967 C10 Fleetside
  • 1973 C30 One-Ton Dually
  • 1988 K1500 Sportside Silverado
  • 1999 Silverado 1500 LT Z71
  • 2007 Silverado 1500 LTZ
  • 2017 Colorado ZR2
  • 2017 Silverado All-Star Edition

It was the most recent step in Chevy trucks’ 100-year evolution from a doorless buckboard that just happened to have an engine instead of a horse.

Chevy trucks through the years:

1918 One-Ton

MSRP: $1,325 (Chassis), $1,460 (Express)

Engine: 3.67L OHV 4-cylinder (224 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 36

U.S. population: 103.2 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.25

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.29

Average household income: $1,518 per year

 

 

1929 International Series Light Duty

MSRP: $400 (Chassis), $595 (Sedan Delivery)

Engine: 3.18L OHV 6-cylinder (194 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 46

Torque: 125 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 121.8 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.21

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.56

Average household income: $1,582

Price of a new home: $7,246

 

1938 Half-Ton

MSRP: $592

Engine: 3.5L I-6 (216.5 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 78

Torque: 170 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 129.8 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.16

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.17

Average household income: $1,730

Price of a new home: $3,900

 

1947 3100 Series

MSRP: $1,087

Engine: 3.5L I-6 (216.5 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 78

Torque: 170 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 144.1 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.19

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.33

Average household income: $2,850

Price of a new home: $6,600

 

1955 3124 Series Cameo Carrier

MSRP: $1,981

Engine: 3.85L Inline Six (235 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 123

Torque: 210 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 165.9 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.25

Price of a gallon of milk: $0.38

Average household income: $4,130

Price of a new home: $10,950

 

1967 C10 Fleetside

MSRP: $2,408

Engine: 4.79L Inline Six (292 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 153

Torque: 255 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 198.7 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.33

Price of a gallon of milk: $1.03

Average household income: $7,143

Price of a new home: $24,600

 

1973 C30 One-Ton Dually

MSRP: $4,388

Engine: 5.03L V8 (307 cubic inches)

Horsepower: 130

Torque: 220 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 211.9 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $0.39

Price of a gallon of milk: $1.31

Average household income: $10,512

Price of a new home: $35,500

 

1988 K1500 Sportside Silverado

MSRP: $12,747

Engine: 5.7L V8

Horsepower: 185

Torque: 295 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 244.5 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $1.08

Price of a gallon of milk: $2.30

Average household income: $27,225

Price of a new home: $138,300

 

1999 Silverado 1500 LT Z71

MSRP: $31,384

Engine: 5.3L V8

Horsepower: 270

Torque: 320 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 279 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $1.17

Price of a gallon of milk: $3.32

Average household income: $39,973

Price of a new home: $195,800

2007 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ (Photo: Chevrolet)

 

2007 Silverado 1500 LTZ

MSRP: $34,990

Engine: 5.3L V8

Horsepower: 315

Torque: 338 lb.-ft.

U.S. population: 301.2 million

Price of a gallon of gas: $3.38

Price of a gallon of milk: $3.87

Average household income: $50,823

Price of a new home: $313,600

 

Information was reblogged from http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2017/09/28/chevy-trucks-general-motors/702921001/

To shop Jack Maxton Chevy Truck inventory, please visit www.jackmaxton.com

Vehicle Profile: 2017 Chevrolet Silverado


silverado-hero

The Chevrolet Silverado, like many other models in the brand’s lineup, is an American icon, and it gets even better for 2017.

The full-size 2017 Chevrolet Silverado starts at an MSRP of $27,585 and is available in six trim levels: WT, LS, Custom, LT, LTZ and High Country. There are three cab styles with Regular Cab, Double Cab and Crew Cab, three box lengths (5’8”, 6’6” and 8’) and all models can be equipped with four-wheel drive.

With all of the recent additions to the Silverado lineup, AutoTrader noted “the latest Silverado makes an excellent case for itself as one of today’s top pickup trucks.” That’s no surprise for the pickup that was named “Highest Ranked Large Light Duty Pickup in Initial Quality, Two Years in a Row” by J.D. Power.

That didn’t stop Chevrolet from making the 2017 model even better. There are two new exterior colors (Pepperdust Metallic and Graphite Metallic) and a capless fuel fill, and the newest model is standard with the Teen Driver feature that promotes safe driving habits by letting parents view various driving information during their child’s time out with their vehicle. The Enhanced Driver Alert Package now features Low Speed Forward Automatic Braking, and Crew Cab models now have the segment’s best max trailering rating of 12,500 pounds.

Safety is a Silverado highlight with six airbags, StabiliTrak Electronic Stability Control, Rollover Mitigation technology, Hill Start Assist and Trailer Sway Control, all standard. A rear vision camera is available. The Enhanced Driver Alert Package (standard on High Country models) adds IntelliBeam headlamps with automatic high-beam control, Front and Rear Park Assist, the Safety Alert Driver Seat, Lane Keep Assist, Forward Collision Alert, and the new Low Speed Forward Automatic Braking. You also get the peace of mind that comes with the OnStar® vehicle telematics system.

There are three engines available for the Silverado, including a 4.3-liter V6, 5.3-liter V8 and 6.2-liter V8. The V6 makes 285 hp and 305 lb/ft of torque, while stepping up to the 5.3-liter V8 gets you 355 hp and 383 lb/ft of torque, with more than 300 lb/ft of torque available from 2,000 to 5,600 rpm. The 6.2-liter V8 produces a potent 420 hp and 460 lb/ft of torque. All engines employ a trifecta of technologies including direct injection, Continuously Variable Valve Timing and Active Fuel Management to make the most out of every drop of fuel. An eight-speed automatic transmission is also available.

The exterior of the Silverado is rugged yet refined with available unique features like the CornerStep rear bumper, EZ Lift and Lower Locking Tailgate, cargo box LED lighting, and power-articulating running boards. Wheels range from 17-inches to 20-inches so you’re sure to find exactly what you’re looking for.

Inside, Chevrolet MyLink® with an eight-inch color touch screen helps keep you connected and you can also add supple leather upholstery. Wireless phone charging, a Bose® sound system, Bluetooth® wireless connectivity, dual zone automatic climate control and a heated steering wheel are also available. You can also add an abundance of packages and accessories to make the Silverado as unique as you are.

Add in two years/24,000-miles of complimentary maintenance (two visits), a three-year/36,000-mile Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty and five-year/60,000-mile Powertrain Limited Warranty with courtesy transportation and roadside assistance, and the Silverado is hard to beat.

Stop by today to let us know you’re interested in the Silverado and we’ll show you some of the impressive models that can help you get the job done.

This article is presented by Jack Maxton Chevrolet in Worthington, Ohio.

5 places to go in your Chevrolet


Take a drive in your Chevrolet – 5 Places to Go Canoeing or Kayaking in Ohio 


Though they may be pretty far from both the East and West Coasts, Ohioans still have plenty of water activities to keep them cool and active during the summertime.

From Lake Erie to the Ohio River, the Buckeye State is full of scenic creeks and waterways that are perfect for paddling. Here are just some of the best places in the state to go canoeing or kayaking.

Mohican River

The village of Loudonville, which is located in between Cleveland and Columbus, has actually earned the nickname “Canoe Capital of Ohio” due to the many liveries located along the Mohican River. Paddling down the river will take you through the beautiful Mohican State Park, which contains three separate camping areas for those looking to turn their trip to Loudonville into a weekend-long getaway. And with nearby hiking trails and zip-lining available, there is no reason not to make the most of your visit. Get a list of nearby rental facilities at http://discovermohican.com/what-to-do.php?UID=24.

Lake Erie

There are many potential launching off points for those looking to paddle Lake Erie, but perhaps the most scenic is found in the Marblehead area. On a clear day, those canoeing and kayaking off the shores of Marblehead will enjoy views of the historic Perry’s Monument on South Bass Island, the towering roller coasters at Cedar Point and the picturesque Marblehead Lighthouse which stands on the rocky shores of the peninsula. For those who do not own their own canoe or kayak, there are many boat rental services in the area, including Put-in-Bay Watercraft Rentals and Kayak the Bay, Ltd on South Bass Island. Learn more about paddling in this area at http://paddling.net/places/showReport.html?2078.

Big Darby Creek

Central Ohio’s Big Darby Creek runs 84 miles from Champaign County down to Franklin County. One of the most biologically diverse aquatic systems in all of the Midwest, the river is home to the only known population of the Scioto madtom species of fish. Those paddling Big Darby Creek should be sure to stop in Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, which is home to bison and other fascinating wildlife. Trapper John’s Canoe Livery in Grove City is one of the most popular boat rental services in the area, and trips and pricing can be found at http://trapperjohnscanoeing.com/#!trips/czpx.

Little Miami River

The 111-mile Little Miami River flows through five counties in southwestern Ohio, beginning in Clark County and emptying into the Ohio River. One of the best stretches of the Little Miami can be enjoyed at Scenic River Canoe Excursions, located in the Greater Cincinnati area. Scenic River Canoe Excursions offers group outings and canoe, kayak and tube rentals for a peaceful, relaxing paddle down one of the state’s most beautiful waterways. To learn more, visit http://scenicrivercanoe.com/.

Hocking River

The rolling Hocking Hills of southeastern Ohio provide some of the most beautiful views in all of Appalachia. While most residents, visitors and students at the nearby Ohio University have hiked through Hocking Hills State Park at one time or another, fewer have experienced the pleasure of paddling down the Hocking River. Fox’s Hocking Hills Canoe Livery in Logan rents out canoes, kayaks and rafts to those wishing to explore the Hocking River, while also providing campsites, cabins and fun Moonlight Tours. For more information, visit http://hockingriver.com/.

From the Big Darby Creek to the Little Miami River, there are waterways of all shapes and sizes in Ohio just waiting to be explored. Hop into a kayak or canoe and paddle your way through some of these scenic spots.

This article is presented by Jack Maxton Chevrolet in Worthington, Ohio

 

In The Community


Jack Maxton Chevrolet participated in the 2015 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5k. Not only did the team walk and raise funds to support the cause, but 4 of our employee’s loved ones are fighting the breast cancer battle right now. It is important to get the word out about yearly mammograms and knowledge about what you can do for early detection. Please click the breast cancer ribbon on the left to see #jackmaxtonchevy pictures from the MSABC 5k. Thank you! 

Places to go in your Chevrolet: 5 Great Camping Sites in Ohio


5 Great Camping Sites in Ohio

Get away from it all in the heart of it all

Camping season is in full swing. Most parks opened up last month and with school’s dismissing soon for the summer, these five great campgrounds in Ohio are sure to be bustling with activity.

Tappan Lake Park

Located in Deersville, Tappan Lake accommodates more than 500 campsites with full hookups and electric, vacation cabins and camper cabins. More than 2,300 acres of water surface are on hand, ready for swimming, boating and fishing. Meanwhile, the 5,000 acres of land are great for hiking a trail that connects the park to the Tappan Wetlands, a designated watchable wildlife area. You can also play on one of the three playgrounds or engage in some sporting activities such as basketball, tennis, volleyball or horseshoes. The activity center has free Wi-Fi, a laundromat and a nature center, which is the home for many daily programs and activities for children. For more information, visit http://tappanpark.mwcd.org/.

Alum Creek State Park

Alum Creek’s 3,387-acre reservoir and 4,630 acres of gently rolling fields and woodlands provide a nucleus of recreational activity just minutes from Ohio’s capital city. Quiet coves nestled among shale cliffs await the solitary fisherman in the park’s northern reaches, while sun-seekers mingle on the state’s largest inland beach. Playground equipment, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, a swimming beach and a boat ramp are designated for campers’ use only, while seemingly endless miles of hiking biking trails run throughout the park, as well. There are camping experiences for everyone here — with almost 300 campsites with 50-amp electrical hookup, three sites that provide a full hookup service including sewer, electricity and water, 30 primitive sites and a group camping area for reserved retreats. For more information, visit http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/alumcreek.

Hocking Hills State Park

Hocking Hills in Logan provides a variety of recreational opportunities in a grand natural setting. The 2,356-acre park has towering cliffs, waterfalls and deep shaded gorges to lure the hiker and naturalist and serve as a backdrop to popular facilities and accommodations. Activities include archery, fishing, nearby hunting, picnicking, pool swimming, hiking and cave exploring, biking and horseback riding. There is no shortage of room for you, as Hocking Hills boasts 15 resorts and campgrounds ranging from cabins to tents to tepees. For more information, visit http://www.hockinghills.com/camping.html.

Indian Lake State Park

The 5,800-acre Indian Lake in Lakeview offers a variety of water-related recreational opportunities including boating, fishing, skiing, hiking, biking and more. Two public beaches provide 1,400 feet of shoreline access to the lake that is surrounded by the 800 acre multi-use park. Nearly 450 family campsites suitable for tents or trailers are available near the lakeshore, and three deluxe cabins can be rented from May through October each year. For more information, visit http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/indianlake or http://www.indianlakearea.com/indian_lake_state_park.htm.

Shawnee State Park

This 1,095-acre park is nestled in the woodlands of Appalachia near the banks of the Ohio River in Portsmouth. Once the hunting grounds of the Shawnee Indians, the region is renowned for its rugged beauty. Roosevelt and Turkey Creek Lakes provide two public beaches for swimming and 68 acres for boating and aquatic sports and fishing.

Six hiking trails traverse the park, along with two bridle trails for 60 miles of backpacking through the wilderness of Ohio. An 18-hole championship golf course is located nearby, along with mini golf, volleyball, basketball and courts, playground equipment and more to be found at the park. The nature center is open from Memorial Day through Labor Day, with more than 100 sites suitable for camping in tents or trailers there, plus two camper cabins, 25 cottages and a 50-room lodge. For more information, visit http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/shawnee.

Enjoy all the environment of Ohio has to offer, anywhere in Ohio, at the stellar above campsites or any of the many others throughout the state.

This article is presented by Jack Maxton Chevrolet in Worthington, Ohio

Tech Tips: Cabin Air Filter Replacement


Why you need it and how to help care for it

When people talk about car care and servicing their cars, they’re normally concerned with the regulars like oil changes and tire rotations. One of the most overlooked aspects of car care, however, is changing the filters, especially the cabin air filter.

The cabin air filter cleans outside air coming in through the vents, so the air you breathe inside the cabin is free of allergens and other pollutants. Cabin air filters should be changed every 12,000 to 15,000-miles (at least once per year), but you should check your owner’s manual for your manufacturer’s specific recommendation. The service technicians at your dealership, the people who know your vehicle best, can answer your questions and provide advice.

Here are a few helpful tips:

What’s That Smell?

 

If you notice an unpleasant odor coming through the vents, it’s probably time for a filter change. It’s been said that pollen and other substances can be up to six times more concentrated inside the car. For allergy sufferers or people with respiratory issues, even a little more contamination in the air can be a bit deal.

Get The Right Part

Don’t just settle for any filter. Be sure to get the filter that is made specifically for your vehicle. While generic options are available and may fit, they are not likely to perform to the standards of a manufacturer-recommended filter; it’s best to get the parts that the manufacturer recommends. Your dealer’s Parts Department has everything you need to ensure maximum efficiency, performance and value.

Why Pay More?

 
Take advantage of your dealer’s seasonal service specials to save money and get a quality job done the right way for your vehicle. Factor in the peace of mind that comes from knowing the work is being done by factory-trained technicians, and the value quotient continues to grow.

Make sure the air you breathe while behind the wheel is the cleanest it can be. Check your cabin air filter, and all the filters in your vehicle, regularly.

This article is presented by Jack Maxton Chevrolet in Worthington, Ohio. www.jackmaxton.com


Chevrolet Special Service Silverado Joins Police Lineup


MY15_Silverado_Police_Fr1_GAN

Silverado 1500 Crew Cab is adapted for police use

The 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab Special Service Vehicle (SSV) joins the brand’s growing police vehicle portfolio. It goes on sale this summer, offering the same capabilities, efficiency and durability as the award-winning Silverado 1500, with special features designed for police use.

The SSV package is available on Silverado 1500 Crew Cab in 1WT or 1LS trims, and includes the 5.3L EcoTec3 V-8, rated at 355 horsepower and delivering the highest EPA-rated fuel economy for a 2WD V-8 full-size pickup: 23 mpg highway. The engine is available with E85 capability. Police agencies can choose 2WD or 4WD models with the standard 6’6” pickup box or a shorter 5’8” box.

“Last year, the Silverado 1500 was awarded for its low cost of ownership,  a key purchasing factor for municipalities and government agencies,” said Ed Peper, U.S. vice president for GM Fleet & Commercial. “The EcoTec3 engine provides the best fuel economy of any V-8 and still gives agencies the power and capability they need from a full-size pickup.”

Contented for service

The Silverado SSV is equipped with a standard 170-amp high-output alternator and 730-CCA auxiliary battery, which allows officers to operate lights, radios, computers, cameras and other equipment while parked with the engine turned off, preserving the charge of the vehicle’s primary battery. The SSV pickup also is equipped with a 110-volt outlet for equipment, and comes standard with electrical power supply for four upfitter switches located on the center stack for easy control and accessibility.

The crew cab offers a vinyl rear seat along with large rear doors for easy entry when transporting passengers. Other available interior options include front center seat delete, which provides an open center console space for police equipment, an auxiliary dome lamp and an electronic four-wheel drive switch located on the dash.

An available common key option allows municipalities to use one key to operate all of their Silverado SSVs and 2015 Tahoe police vehicles. Chevrolet will offer ship-through options for the upfit of light bars, sirens, partitions and additional aftermarket equipment.

 SSV package at a glance

Standard features:

  • 5.3L EcotTec3 V-8 engine
  • Auxiliary transmission oil cooler
  • High-capacity air cleaner
  • 170-amp high-output alternator
  • 730-CCA auxiliary battery
  • 110-volt outlet
  • Four upfitter switches with electrical power supply

 Available features:

  • Spotlamp – driver or driver and passenger
  • Wiring for grille, lamp and sirens
  • Flasher system for headlamps and taillamps
  • Common key package
  • Vinyl rear seat
  • Front center seat delete
  • Auxiliary dome lamp
  • Electronic four-wheel-drive switch
  • Daytime running lamps delete
  • Rear-vision camera

 Silverado 1500: Proven capabilities and comfort

The 5.3L EcoTec3 V-8 engine is certified at 355 horsepower and 383 lb-ft of torque. It combines direct fuel injection, Active Fuel Management (cylinder deactivation) and continuously variable valve timing to achieve EPA-estimated fuel economy of 23 mpg highway (2WD models). It’s the best fuel economy of any V-8 pickup on the market.

 

Information provided by

http://www.chevy.com

http://www.gm.com

http://www.jackmaxton.com